surrender

February 3, 2011

“Surrender!” shouted Murgatroyd, as he pointed his brand new pop gun at Bob.

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The Illustration Friday theme for the week, and for 5 more minutes, is “surrender”. I’m really living on the edge these days!

advent calendar – day 10

December 10, 2009

Some presents really HIT THE BULL’S EYE!

bullseye_color2

or

“It’s all breezy, fun and games until someone loses an eye!”
………………………………………………………………………………….

This week’s Illustration Friday word is “breezy” and my submission is a bit of a stretch, but hey, it works… no?

So anyway, a bull’s-eye is the center of a target in both archery and darts. The shot taken to achieve this feat is called hitting the bull’s-eye.

Although originally a sports term, bull’s-eye can be used for pretty much any design or pattern utilizing concentric circles. Bull’s-eye can also be used to describe a lens of short focal length, a circular window, a piece of glass inserted into a ship’s deck, or those round, striped mints you stuff into your pockets when the waitress isn’t looking, as you leave the restaurant. That’s right, I know you do.

Being quite the versatile idiom, “hitting the bull’s-eye” along with “hit the mark” and “hit the nail on the head” is used when someone or something is absolutely correct. For example: “Honey, your remark about my butt looking fat in these jeans really hit the bull’s-eye. Now here’s your pillow. Enjoy sleeping on the couch tonight.”

Anywho… bull’s-eye… versatile… oh yes, the origin… no luck there. Although it may have been used since the 17th century, the etymology seems to be a mystery. At least none of my sophisticated sources (Google) has revealed anything.

I do have one question however. Why a bull’s eye? Why not a fish, bird or, I don’t know, a moose eye? Perhaps a dinosaur’s eye? Something to think about on some breezy, Spring evening, while sipping a nice fizzy, champagne cocktail and you’ve nothing more important to ponder.

hitting the bull’s eye

March 19, 2008

bullseye.jpg

or

“You’re not going to be happy until you put someone’s eye out
…………………………………………………….

A bull’s-eye is the center of a target in both archery and darts. The shot taken to achieve this feat is called hitting the bull’s-eye.

Although originally a sports term, bull’s-eye can be used for pretty much any design or pattern utilizing concentric circles. Bull’s-eye can also be used to describe a lens of short focal length, a circular window, a piece of glass inserted into a ship’s deck, or those round, striped mints you stuff into your pockets when the waitress isn’t looking, as you leave the restaurant. That’s right, I know you do.

Being quite the versatile idiom, hitting the bull’s-eye along with hit the mark and hit the nail on the head is used when someone or something is absolutely correct. For example:

“Honey, your remark about my butt looking fat in these jeans really hit the bull’s-eye. Now here’s your pillow. Enjoy sleeping on the couch tonight.”

Anywho… bull’s-eye… versatile… oh yes, the origin. Yeah, no luck there. It may have been used since the 17th century, but the etymology seems to be a mystery. At least none of my sophisticated sources (Google) has revealed anything.

I do have one question however. Why a bull’s eye? Why not a fish or a bird or a bunny’s eye? How about dinosaur’s eye? Something to think about when you don’t have anything more important to ponder.